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DAC Commemorates 50th Anniversary of the MLK March

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A Few Facts about the Freedom Walk


The Detroit "Walk to Freedom" took place on Sunday, June 23, 1963. 

Dr. King was traveling from California to New York. With an estimated crowd of 125,000, the Detroit visit was the most successful. 

    The Detroit Free Press called the Detroit march "the largest civil rights demonstration in the nation's history."


    Marchers sang many songs, including "We Shall Overcome" and "The Battle Hymn of the Republic."

    The Detroit Council for Human Rights, led by its director, Benjamin McFall, and its chairman, Rev. Clarence L. Franklin, organized the walk. 


    The march ended at Cobo Hall, where Dr. King addressed the crowd. During his speech, he repeated the phrase, "I have a dream" several times, leading many to believe the beginnings of his famous "I Have a Dream" speech started in Detroit.

    SOURCE: www.Michigan.gov


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    More than 150 Detroit Deltas turned out to march for freedom and mark the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s 1963 March for Freedom in Detroit.

    The 50th Anniversary Freedom March down Woodward Avenue also reminded thousands gathered that much work remains to be done to make Dr. King's dream a reality for all Americans.

    Deltas marched proudly, holding a banner honoring our 22 Founders, whose first public act 100 years ago was a march for human rights, specifically the right of women to vote.

     

     

    This year's marchers were also following in the footsteps of Delta women who were among thousands who marked with King in Detroit 50 years ago.

    "On fairly short notice, we turned out a full contingent of sorors," said Alicia Nails, the Detroit Deltas' march captain. "When the city of Detroit turns out to make a political statement about civil rights, it is most fitting that Deltas are represented. Our presence not only acknowledged our history, but it was also in line with our present mission to continue moving forward in securing our rights."